Environmental and Occupational Risk Factors for Bladder Cancer – A BCAN Patient Insight Webinar

Smoking tobacco is a well-established risk factor for bladder cancer. Yet so many BCAN patients have never smoked. What are the other factors that influence risk of this disease? And, can any of them be avoided?

In this webinar, Dr. Debra Silverman, Chief of the Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch within the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at the National Cancer Institute, will share the latest science linking bladder cancer with exposure to a range of occupational and environmental carcinogens. Dr. Silverman will concentrate much of her talk on exposure to water pollutants and bladder cancer – a focus of her recent research.

Brief reflections and remarks regarding what this evidence means for advancing bladder cancer prevention efforts will be offered by Lynn Thorp, National Campaign Director at Clean Water Action and Dr. Polly Hoppin, Research Professor at the University of Massachusetts Lowell’s Department of Public Health and on the Leadership Council of the Cancer Free Economy Network

Register for the free webinar.

A link to view the recorded program will be sent to all who are registered for the program after the program concludes.

Tue, Jul 24th from 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM EDT

This is the registration link. Please feel free to share!
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3487303829206792195

Wee Tests!

This company is offering home urine tests: www.wetestonline.com

It’s cheaper than a doctor’s visit. Useful if you have some concerns about your wee and it’s difficult for you to get to doctor.

However we must stress, if you notice a change in your urine, especially pink or red urine ….. GET TO A DOCTOR.

Flying our Aussie Flag at BCAN’s 2018 Think Tank in Denver, Colorado

Only a few weeks to go until our ever-passionate board member and patient advocate, Dr Stephanie Demkiw, heads to Colorado to collaborate with BCAN in their annual ‘Think Tank’. This scientific assembly is the premier bladder cancer-specific medical meeting in North America and brings together some of the top medical and scientific minds in bladder cancer.

Since its inception in 2006, the Think Tank meeting has focused on identifying obstacles and creating solutions in bladder cancer research, and has fostered discussions to help define priorities for advancing such research, across the bladder cancer spectrum.

Invited participants include urologists, oncologists, researchers, pathologists, social scientists and patient advocates, all with a shared focus – dedicated to improving the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer.

BladderCancer.org.au would like to take the opportunity to thank everyone who made such generous donations in order to get our Australian voice on the international map!

Highlight on Urology Nurses

Bladder Cancer patients know only too well, the value of specialist nurses who understands stomas, neo bladders, continence issues, ED treatments and all the trials that are associated with bladder cancer.  Kath Schubach is Vice President of Australia & New Zealand Urology Nurses Society (ANZUNS) and also with the Victorian state chapter, VUNS.

Kath says:  “Accurate and evidenced based information is extremely important for bladder cancer patients in all aspects of their care. Nurse’s play a pivotal role in providing patients with this information.”

How do we help nurses remain current in their practice?

Most urology nurses are members of their local Urological Societies. Each society provides its members with access to ongoing education, seminars, and support to attend annual scientific meetings and professional development. This provides opportunity for collaboration and sharing information with our peers and medical colleagues. It also provides us with a direct membership to the Australia and New Zealand Urology Nurses Society (ANZUNS).

Did you know the Australia and New Zealand Urological Nurses Society (ANZUNS) is the peak professional organisation for urology nursing in Australia and New Zealand? The aim of ANZUNS is to promote excellence in urological nursing through research, education & mentoring. I encourage you to access this website and search to see what your local urology society is achieving.

You can contact ANZUNS at www.anzuns.org or by emailing anzunspresident16@gmail.com

My Dad has bladder cancer

Hello,

I am currently having my Dad go through Bladder Cancer. He was diagnosed with a tumor back in September last year a biopsy was and it turns out it was cancer on the bladder. He was not a smoker, rarely drinks and lives a pretty good life. He was turning 70 in December so this came as a huge shock to all of us. We had to have an operation to remove the tumour because that was causing him so much pain, we were in hospital a few times because the pain was so excruciating for him. Once this first operation was complete we had to go onto chemo to help with the remainder of the cancer. We did 4 cycles of that which took 4 months and then last week he went in for major surgery for 9 hours to remove his bladder, prostate and some lymph nodes. Whilst they were in the operation the surgeon actually found some more possible cancer nodules and was not going to take any risks so he took them out too.

He has been in hospital for a week now and each day is different with pain or nausea, etc. All the general things you should be feeling after having major surgery and its upsetting him and frustrating him that he feels like he isn’t getting better but he actually is, he started the first day with 3 bags attached to his body and now he just has one which is the stoma bag for the diversion of his urine. (This is permanent) But by the 3rd day all but that one bag was gone, he is walking further and further each day. But he has this negative mindset the second one thing goes wrong. He’s not sleeping well and barely eating and he is snapping at both myself and mum, and that hits us hard. Today I actually got so mad at him I walked out. I get he is going through alot of stuff but so are we and if that attitude is going to stay then he can bloody well stay in the hospital because mum will not be able to handle that alone if he comes home.

He has just survived a cancer that could kill him, he should be thankful and positive and happy. The doctors and nurses and the surgeon even said how lucky he was that they caught this early. 6 months time this could have been a whole different ballgame. I need someone who has been through this and survived to go and speak to him and tell him he will be ok because us telling him has had no effect because he is doing is getting angry. He is a routines man, and very OCD so if something is out of place and not in the right spot or you say one thing he just goes off. Today he went off because the patients around him were being too loud. Like small stuff. I just don’t know what to do anymore or how to help him anymore than we are already doing.

Anyone got any advice, or want to go and speak to him for me? I think hearing from someone who has gone through it would definitely help him.

BCGosis…

Update on my BCG treatment was I never got to number 6, I was admitted into the San with what was eventually diagnosed as BCGosis… I basically contracted Tuburculosis, means I can no longer have BCG, am now having Chemo infusion…
3 down, three more, wait six weeks then a biopsy.
Very nervous about how this is going, hopefully not to removal of the bladder…
The journey continues.