Our booklet endorsed by the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand

The Bladder Cancer – Solving The Puzzle booklet is endorsed by the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand (USANZ) – August 2017

Further to your letter of 3 April 2017 …. seeking endorsement of the Bladder Cancer Booklet produced by the Bladder Cancer Australia Charity Foundation, the Board referred it to the Genitourinary Special Advisory Group for review of the scientific aspects. The SAG recently reported back that they had no concerns about the contents and felt it would be a useful resource.

The USANZ Board endorsed the booklet and approved the use of the USANZ logo and the establishment of reciprocal links through the bladdercancer.org.au website.

Congratulations to the Foundation on this initiative.

Regards
USANZ

Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand

Bladder cancer survivor, surgeon team up for charity

An article featuring Bladder Cancer Australia Charity founders Tony Moore and urological surgeon Nathan Lawrentschuk appeared on ABC News 27 February 2017

Bladder cancer survivor, surgeon team up for charity
By Adrienne Francis

Tony Moore hopes the foundation will boost awareness about the potentially fatal cancer. Photo for ABC News by Wayne Chapman
Tony Moore hopes the foundation will boost awareness about the potentially fatal cancer.
Photo for ABC News by Wayne Chapman

A bladder cancer survivor has teamed up with his urologist to create a new charity and deliver free Australian education resource for patients after frustration about the lack of local information available.

The Bladder Cancer Australia Charity Foundation aims to raise awareness of the disease, which it said was the fourth most common cancer in Australian men — despite receiving little attention.

About 3,000 Australians are diagnosed with bladder cancer each year, and urological surgeon Nathan Lawrentschuk said it was one of the hardest cancers to treat if detected late.

Associate Professor Lawrentschuk said he had teamed up with one of his former patients, Melbourne musician Tony Moore, in a bid to increase early detection rates.